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Wednesday, 15 August

15:12

Water from the Stone of CNMI Sovereignty "IndyWatch Feed 1stpeople.pacific"

Next month I'll be back in Washington D.C. to resume my research about federal territorial relations that I began last year. Much of my focus last year was on Guam and its commonwealth movement, but as I conducted interviews and sifted through files, I also found more and more references to the commonwealth of the CNMI as well and found its evolution and devolution to be even more fascinating. Even just the contrast of reading about what has taken place there for the past few decades in federal documents versus local government is striking. Take for example when a number of sovereignty provisions that had been negotiated through the commonwealth were lost about ten years ago. This process was referred to the in CNMI as a "federalization," akin to a takeover by the federal government. Within the federal government however it was referred to as as normalizing of a relationship, whereby those provisions were considered to be only temporary and would eventually be done away with once the CNMI had experienced some economic development. It is so intriguing to see one side argue that something was never set in stone, but always fluid like water, while the other states it was set in stone and either we lost the stone or someone grabbed it and smashed most of it.

I look forward to returning to this research. It has put me back in the mood for reading about the garment industry that the CNMI once boasted. Here is an article from 2005 in the Saipan Tribune that I came across recently.

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The rise and fall of the garment industry in the CNMI
by Jesus D. Camacho
Saipan Tribune
May 17, 2005
https://www.saipantribune.com/index.php/a360ee58-1dfb-11e4-aedf-250bc8c9958e/

According to the Tan Holdings Corp. website, Dr. Tan Siu Lin and his family brought THC to Guam in the early 70s and embarked on a variety of businesses: shipping, real estate, amusement, and movie distribution. Approximately six years after THC began conducting business in the Marianas, the Northern Marianas Islands became a bona fide Commonwealth in 1978.

Approximately five years after the CNMI came into existence, the Tan Siu Lin family made the decision to move the corporate headquarters from Guam to the CNMI in 1983. Subsequent to relocating to the Commonwealth, THC began to grow and become an extremely diversified and multifaceted corporation handling the gamut in t...

14:55

Iya Hagta "IndyWatch Feed 1stpeople.pacific"

Infotmasion put i siudat (mismo songsong, lao i maga'songsong para i Islan Guhan) gi Fino' Chamoru. Hu tuge' este para un curriculum project dos aos ttte. Ya-hu bei na'huyong guini lokkue', sa' hu Tango' na guaha estudiante pat otro e'eyak ni' sesso manmambisisita guini gi este na blog, ya ma kekealigao este na klasen tiningo'.

**********************

Put iya Hagta

Guhan i ms dngkolo na isla gi islas Marianas. Hagta i kapitt na siudat. Gaige meggai na ofisinan gobietno giya Hagta. Gaige lokkue i gima i Gobietno yan i
Lihelaturan Guhan.

I Plsa de Espaa mahtsa desdi i tiempon Espaot; manggaige guihi i kosas yan estorian i manmasusedi gi duranten i tiempon Espaot. Gaige i Plsa gi fion i gimayuos Dulce de Maria Cathedral-Basilica.  Dngkolo este na gumayuos ya ma silelebra i gipot Santa Marian Kamalen gi diha ocho gi Disembre guini. Dngkolo este na silebrasion giya Guahan. I hinenggen Katoliko gi tiempon Espaot  ha gof tulaika i hinengge yan kottura gi entre i Chamorro siha. Mas di kuattro sientos aos i Espaot ha okupa i Islas Marianas. Meggai na tradision yan kustombre gi Chamorro pgo ginen este na hestoria.  
...

14:20

United Natives Against Bureaucratic Miasma "IndyWatch Feed 1stpeople.pacific"

I first traveled to the United Nations to testify in 2007. I testified along with two other Marie Auyong and Rima Miles before the Fourth Committee on the situation in Guam. We came in the wake of a larger delegation the year before which featured Victoria Leon Guerrero, Julian Aguon, Sabina Perez, Fanai Castro, Tiffany Lacsado and Kerri Ann Borja. That trip represented a big moment in sort of post-nation Chamoru/Angel Santos activism in Guam and the diaspora. The trip first came from a conference in San Diego that I along with a few others had organized in April 2006 about decolonization and Chamoru issues. It was, as far as any of us could tell, the first of its kind in the diaspora. The gathering of so many critical and conscious Chamorus in one place led to a great number of things, one of which was a period of new engagement around the United Nations.

Chamorus had been traveling on and off to the UN since 1982. There were high points, usually when the Government of Guam wanted to try to shame the US about something or draw more attention to something the US was ignoring, but for the most part, only one or two people, or no one would travel to the UN to testify. That trip in 2006 wasn't organized by anyone with government of Guam connections, but rather activists either raised in the diaspora or just in the states for school, who wanted to draw attention to the military buildup that had been announced back home.

2006 was a high point, as the group met with countries and UN officials, who were all eager to see some activity in Guam again around decolonization. The first year I attended was simply a placeholder, a reminder that even if we hadn't returned with the same intensity, we were still there and did not want to be dismissed or forgotten. I hadn't even planned on testifying, but was asked at the last minute and ended up flying out with just a day or two notice.

Another larger group returned in 2008, but even in my short time within the UN infrastructure I was struck by a number of things. Once the luster and grandness of the place wore off, you were left with a hollowness, especially coming from a colony. As I wrote in my dissertation, the UN gift shop was a particularly depressing spectacle, as flags from nearly every UN member were there, but none for the colonies.

As much as testifying there before the Fourth Com...

04:03

00:33

Free Hawai`i "IndyWatch Feed 1stpeople.pacific"

FREE TO THE PUBLIC THIS FRIDAY AT `IOLANI PALACE GROUNDS



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Tuesday, 14 August

02:40

00:29

Free Hawai`i "IndyWatch Feed 1stpeople.pacific"

TWENTY YEARS AGO THIS MONTH
THE ALOHA MARCH IN WASHINGTON DC 





...

Monday, 13 August

01:29

Free Hawai`i "IndyWatch Feed 1stpeople.pacific"

HAWAIIAN KINGDOM PROGRESS UPDATE ON VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IS FUTURE"


"Hawaiian Kingdom Worldwide Support - A Visit With Leon Siu"

Theres been some amazing Hawaiian Kingdom progress lately at the United Nations in both New York and Geneva. So we spent an afternoon with Leon Siu to learn all about it. What we found most fascinating is hearing that UN member nations are starting to ask one simple question regarding Hawaiian Kingdom government restoration - How can we help? Dont miss our visit with Leon because we think youll be as excited as we were as we began to see the bigger picture and what it means for the future of Hawai`i Watch It Here...

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